Monster tales and the fictional reality (Third Part) ⇒ Kirno Sohochari

By echoing with the previous part (See: Monster tales and the fictional reality (Second Part) we can say Yudhishthira comprehended the nature of Dharma when Vanaprastha appeared inevitable in his front. Repentance captured the grand landscape of Mahabharata just after the bloody war had finished. Despondency was apparently unbearable to the king and his beloved brothers. Yudhishthira was obliged to take over the kingdom exchanges of massive bloodshed and sacrifice. This feeling deeply fractured his mind, and he lost his minimal interest of enjoying the kingship so far. It was not easy for him to erase the horrible moments of the war. Kurukshetra was a battle of egotism and the bloody war killed his relatives, friends, guides and many other innocent people. Thousands of brave soldiers sacrificed their lives just serving the egotism of two royal enemies.

The great Bhishma (grandfather and guardian of Kuru and Pandavas) has no more existed on this earth. Dronacharya (the respected war-instructor of both families) is no more here for educating his beloved disciples. The valiant and charitable Karna is already expired by death. He is not present here for terrifying enemy’s heart and his boastful words or derision is no more exist of hurting somebody. The tragic valiant was battling against his own siblings despite to know that he is the progeny of royal blood, an ill-fated offspring of Kunti and Sun Deity. It was not a secret for him that, albeit a low-caste chariot driver fostered him with great love and care but firstly he carried the regal blood of King Pandu’s dynasty. Karna knew that he is the son of a virgin princess who floated him in the river on a basket.

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Sparotok: Courage and greatness of our ancestors

… The moral is simple; —nothing exists when the days are over. Animal, human, deity or the monster gets equal fate in the meaningless non-fictional reality. They dissolved in the Nirgun Samadhi and staying eternally in the meaningless reality, which is purposelessly autonomous to its state of action. Yudhishthira is just now entered the reality that has no beginning and neither an ending.
… … …

A future warrior was coming out to the world secretly. His begetting mother floated him in the river. She was eager to avoid society’s criticism. Kunti never exposed it until Arjuna killed Karna on the battlefield. He killed his own brother because of Kunti’s whimsical fear and prejudice to the truth. She was a frivolous young virgin at that time who called the powerful Sun Deity privately in her room. Her first sexual union with the Sun Deity was disgraceful. The deity apparently forced her in sex and it was distressful for the inexperienced woman. No romance was present there when Sun Deity abducted Kunti’s virginity. The heartbreaking experience prevented Kunti at later of debunking Karna’s birth secret openly. Karna is the unexpected birth experience of a virgin princess whose first sexual union happened against her will.

There was a reason for her calling. Kunti was curious and excited to test the boon she got from Durvasa Muni (a sage or an ascetic) who is famous for his moody attitude and short-temper. Durvasa is the master of the curse, who can curse anybody if his action seemed irritating to him. Anyway, the short-tempered Muni once stayed few days in King Sursen’s (Kunti’s father) palace. The king knew Durvasa’s habit and he appointed his daughter Kunti for his hospitality. Durvasa was very pleased to receive such hospitality and rewarded the virgin princess that she can call male deities for lovemaking. The curious virgin then called Sun Deity for testing the usability of Durvasa’s boon. Her curiosity was innocent on that time of calling but the choice was not perfect. The Sun Deity is a reckless lover, is always crazy and whimsical; he is going fretful and promiscuous when he sips woman’s beauty; therefore the curious call has soon appeared disastrous to the caller.

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Surrealism 9: Kunti tests the Mantra, given by Durvasa Muni

… This dreadful silence is the real exposure where a mournful mother revealed the birth secret of her demised son. Kunti gained her confidence of revealing Karna’s birth secret to the Pandavas but in too late; because Karna was no more existed in life, nor he is able to return in his mother’s womb!
… … …

Kunti’s first experience of sexual union was a mistake. Karna is the mistaken breed of a woman who was inexperienced about lovemaking-lust on those days. Her first calling of testing Durvasa’s boon was not romantic. She was unfortunate who never got a chance to test the flavor of pure love and romantic sexual union. Her first lovemaking experience was simply a disaster, and as well the later. Calling other deities at later was truly political, which was necessary to serve the utilitarian purpose. She applied Durvasa’s boon again when Pandu lost his breeding capacity due to the faulty action of hunting an animal in the jungle. Kunti’s boon rescued Pandava dynasty to the risk of having no successor in the future. As customary, the reason was non-romantic. Durvasa’s boon helped Kunti to save her husband’s dynasty, albeit it appeared a curse to the loveless woman who never gets a single chance of smelling the sweet fragrance of lovemaking union. Karna is the victim of those ill-fated consequences what was happening in Kunti’s loveless life.

Anyway, some mistake is irrecoverable and no consolation can reconcile it. Kunti is now lamenting for Karna and Yudhishthira lost his passion of ruling the barren kingdom anymore. None of anybody in Kuru dynasty has existed who can incite Pandavas in an unjust war. The victory has already turned into a defeat to the Pandava King. Nothing has existed which he can rule as a victorious king. Clouds of excruciating pain and repentance by now captured the sky and Yudhishthira’s regret provoked him to leave everything so that he can search the eternal resting place with an empty mind. The meaning of life has no more existed after the bloodbath event. Yudhishthira is now ready to leave all bonding and burden that appeared legal or justified to him just before the annihilation of life in Kurukshetra. Vanaprastha is knocking on the door and calling him to leave this earthly shell forever.

Yudhishthira’s unknown journey started along with his brothers. Draupadi, the lovely and only beloved of Poncho Pandavas (five brothers) also accompanied them on this journey. The journey is outlandish and they start it like a stranger. They are not concerned about the route, nor they have any idea of where this earthly form will vanish and soul gets it own path to stay in silence. None of them had any idea that where the eternity really existed and how far it is. The journey appeared insufferable to them. Let traveling once again in the dramatic moment through Mahabharata’s grand narrative.

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Nadroop: Ateet ki Parchhaiyan

… She loved her beguilement power which can easefully twisted man’s heart in a minute difference. The dark-colored beauty was fascinated to her own appeal. Draupadi had a self-lovable personality which none can deny by one word.
… … …

Look, Draupadi is lying on the ground. She is lying as like the abandoned stuff and her dazzling dark-colored shell has no difference with the snake’s fell. Both were spellbinder before leaving this hypnotic shell in the ground. The dark-colored beauty is not magically venomous now as she was in her earthly life. This woman was the most precious gift of the earth. King Dhrupad’s daughter was adorable to the Pandavas for her zeal and provocative womanliness, and she was Krishna’s favorite because of her bright personality and intellect. Draupadi knew that she was attractive, intelligent and provocative for winning men’s heart.

She loved her beguilement power which can easefully twisted man’s heart in a minute difference. The dark-colored beauty was fascinated to her own appeal. Draupadi had a self-lovable personality which none can deny by one word. Panchali (Draupadi’s another name) was obliged to see her beauty and quality in the mirror, for instance, a Narcissist always confined himself within his cage. Loving your own Self is essential if you want to love others, but it has to be a trap if you ignore the difference amid Selfism and Narcissism, since it can possess you in uppity. Draupadi was trapped before rescued her mind to the boastful elegance of woman’s beauty and beguilement.

The dark-colored beauty was promise-bound that she will love all her husband in the same fashion and affection. It’s not possible for a woman whose mind is questing the man who can admire her beauty in the perfect fashion. Draupadi’s desire was not wrong in that sense. Her desire of getting the perfect one is organic and an organic love can never be equitable to the equal love of all. She was naturally not an exception in the context. Panchali was obsessed to Arjuna and found her true matching in the valiant warrior and true womanizer of that time. Her inner heart was always blossoming to think Partha’s (Arjuna’s another name) ambidextrous quality of looting woman’s heart.

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New Girl: Draupadi Vastraharan

… Panchali (Draupadi’s another name) was obliged to see her beauty and quality in the mirror, for instance, a Narcissist always confined himself within his cage. Loving your own Self is essential if you want to love others, but it has to be a trap if you ignore the difference amid Selfism and Narcissism, since it can possess you in uppity. Draupadi was trapped before rescued her mind to the boastful elegance of woman’s beauty and beguilement.
… … …

Draupadi’s Kamashakti (using the energy of pleasurable lust through tender and adoring love) provoked her secretly to love Sabyasachi (the Ambidexter, Arjuna’s adjectival qualities of using his both hands in archery) rather than other Pandava brothers. She loved her five hubbies as a wife can love and adore but Arjuna was her only true passion. Panchali had a true desire of identified as Arjuna’s darling in people’s eyes. Her dark-colored eyelid was blinking to see the womanizer and there was no room for Yudhishthira or the innocent looking gallant boy Bhima. The woman was prideful to think that she is the dearest Sakhi (the most beloved friend) of Krishna. Yes, Draupadi was Krishna’s Sakhi, but the title is meaningless at this moment. Krishna’s beloved friend is lying on the ground and facing the transmutation of her embodied shell.

Draupadi had deserved this. Bhima’s love was unconditional and candid to her but she never felt any urge to take it seriously. She played a game with Bhima’s emotion, the kids as if played with their toys. The gallant looking man was so innocent to read the meaning of women’s beguilement. Bhima was not so clever to read the pretentious expression or insinuation of an intelligent woman like Draupadi. He was merely a child to the vivacious woman and her levity used Bhima’s anger to get revenge against the Kurus. It was hard for Draupadi being aloof to the moment when Yudhishthira lost everything in the tricky gambling. The impudent Kuru members insulted Draupadi by taking the shameful attitude to the menstruated woman. Shakuni trapped Yudhishthira of playing dice with him but Dharmaraj was not a great player who can win the game by vanquished Shakuni’s trick.

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The theater times: Battlefield, directed by Peter Brook. Photo: Caroline Moreau

… Mahabharata’s narrative is multilinear in its characterization. There is no ultimate hero or villain existed to the end of this narrative. None is good, better or best to the end, of anybody is neither worst nor heinous in compare to the other. The stream of Karma drives Mahabharata’s characters to accomplish their action according to the desire they have. The earthly existence is bound to chase behind the desire, otherwise, the finishing line of all desire (which we call Karmafal) never be appeared to the end.
… … …

Yudhishthira’s baffling propensity not only humiliated Pandavas, it destroyed Draupadi’s pride and honor too. Duryodhana and Dushshasona insulted her in presence of all respected guardians in the assembly. They were eager to see her naked. Krishna’s miracle saved Draupadi when Dushshasona tried to disrobe her in front of the assembly. This bitter experience was naturally unforgettable to Draupadi, and she used Bhima’s blind rage to take revenge against Duryodhana and Dushshasona. The woman applied her beguilement of inciting Bhima against the Kurus. She always reminded Bhima about the promise that he will break Duryodhana’s thigh and drink Dushshasona’s blood by splitting his heart in wartime. Draupadi had taken the revenge by using Bhima’s monstrous temper and strength. However, none of this appeared useful now. The dark-colored beauty is lying on the ground to embrace the death-flame. Beauty and envy are now lean towards the ground just like the twin sister.

Now it’s Arjuna’s turn. The Ambidexter is lying on the ground despite his incomparable bravery in wartime. He is no more in life for satisfying his self-conceit that he is the best warrior on earth. Maybe he is lying onto the ground due to Karna. Karna’s killing was unethical in light of war principle. Krishna was inciting Arjuna to kill his rival and Arjuna did this sans any ethical hesitation. Karna’s birth secret was not a hidden secret to Krishna but he never opened his mouth to Pandavas that they are fighting against their eldest brother. 

Karna’s hostility against Pandavas had its own cause and effect. He was unable of accepting what Kunti has done after delivering him. He always felt him an abandoned and ignored child of his mother. A monster was awakening in his mind due to the fear-phobia of his birthing mother. The inner sadness and sensitivity to his birthing mother motivated Karna behaving rudely to his mother. He was an unlucky child. The unwilling birth incident pushed him to face the bitter experience of Indian caste system. He had a great competency but the upper caste always insulted him, even they declared him incompetent because of his lower caste breeding. Draupadi insulted and refused him in the Swayamvar Sabha just because of the lower caste inheritance, albeit the great valiant proved his ability as a competitor to get Draupadi. His hostility increased due to the favoritism of high-class people, their one-sided mind tried to prioritize Arjuna in many times.

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BAM 150 years: Celebrate Halloween with The Mahabharata! Photo: Martha Swope

… Life is the essence of action and equally the consequence of reaction to the action. The striking cause-effect relation amid any action systematically confined the existence in a conceptual framework. Virtue, sin, reward or punishment is simply the conceptual jargon, represents the result of the action has done by the man, but it cannot free a man to the slavery of his own desire.
… … …

Karna is the unpronounced breathing of King Pandu’s successors. Pandu himself was unfortunate. He was not the legitimate father of his six children. They were born with the legitimacy of deities. King Pandu once mistakenly killed a doe in the jungle. She was in deep orgasmic love with her partner at that time. The gazelle cursed Pandu and he lost his breeding capacity. It cursed him, “Bloody fool! You destroy my heavenly pleasure. Wait, the same thing will happen to you in the future. The day will come and you will embrace the same fate as I have suffered now. You will die at the peak moment of your orgasmic pleasure.” The curse appeared a threat to the king. Pandu’s beloved wife Kunti saved him by calling deities to give successor’s birth in her womb and as well Madri. Pandu had no alternate in his hand to save the dynasty and he died according to the curse dictum. The great king was leaned in Madri’s chest before completing his last lovemaking lust.

There are stories behind the story. Pandu allowed Kunti to take deity’s legitimacy but he has never known that Karna is the first lamp of Pandava lineage. Arjuna’s lifetime enemy was the effect of Sun Deity’s profligacy with virgin Kunti. The first son of Pandava lineage was a painful respiration to his mother when Arjuna killed him in Kurukshetra War. Karna did not prevent Arjuna from killing, because, death in the rivalry was inevitable at that moment.

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The great Indian performance: Peter Brook’s Mahabharata

… Karna’s hostility against Pandavas had its own cause and effect. He was unable of accepting what Kunti has done after delivering him. He always felt him an abandoned and ignored child of his mother. A monster was awakening in his mind due to the fear-phobia of his birthing mother. The inner sadness and sensitivity to his birthing mother motivated Karna behaving rudely to his mother. He was an unlucky child. The unwilling birth incident pushed him to face the bitter experience of Indian caste system.
… … …

Kunti met Karna before the frontline battle started amid her two valiant sons. The meeting was not pleasant for her. Deprived Karna’s emotion was bursting out with complaints. The insistence boy refused birthing mother’s proposal for avoiding the bloodshed of his siblings. He refused Kunti on an excuse that he is promise bound to fight for Duryodhana who gave him respect and honor. Karna’s wording to her mother was heart striking when he said, “look, mother, everybody knows you have five sons and the number will be the same even after the war has ended. I have no animosity to the rest. I keep my animosity to Arjuna. It is inevitable that amid us one will be must die. I will kill Arjuna; so the declared number five can remain as it remains now. The addition will be the same when you get me in Arjuna’s place. The justified five will still remain after the war.”

Mahabharata’s narrative is multilinear in its characterization. There is no ultimate hero or villain existed to the end of this narrative. None is good, better or best to the end, of anybody is neither worst nor heinous in compare to the other. The stream of Karma drives Mahabharata’s characters to accomplish their action according to the desire they have. The earthly existence is bound to chase behind the desire, otherwise, the finishing line of all desire (which we call Karmafal) never be appeared to the end.

Life is the essence of action and equally the consequence of reaction to the action. The striking cause-effect relation amid any action systematically confined the existence in a conceptual framework. Virtue, sin, reward or punishment is simply the conceptual jargon, represents the result of the action has done by the man, but it cannot free a man to the slavery of his own desire. This body is incapable of realizing the reality that, none is virtuous or nobody is heinous in the real existential state, in where nothing exists which can be achievable through desire. When a man realized the truth, he then stimulated his mind to cross the mind-barrier so he can finish his work without any hope of success or anxiety of failure. This is the eternal state where a man switched off his mind of achieving something through his action.

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Caravan magazine: The Mahabharata Of Our time: Peter Brook’s epic

… The victory has already turned into a defeat to the Pandava King. Nothing has existed which he can rule as a victorious king. Clouds of excruciating pain and repentance by now captured the sky and Yudhishthira’s regret provoked him to leave everything so that he can search the eternal resting place with an empty mind.
… … …

Mahabharata’s fictional prelude started with the daring egotism, the characters were eager to fulfill their earthly desire of life, but the ending of this battle was pathetically dreadful, in where the mournful regret declared the necessity of peace over and again. Yes, stay in peace to the feeling that you have nothing to achieve in the battle of egotism but you can lose everything that you have desired. Shanti Parva recalled the truth that egotism is just a mind-game of this earthly life but it disguised the fact that life is commencing here from the ultimate Nothingness.

Existence has no desire when it stayed or commencing to the Nothingness and the same thing happened when it melted in the Nothingness after accomplished the action. Mahabharata’s grand landscape is fictional amid the arrival and departure moments of its dramatically confusing events, and the landscape is real when Shanti Parva appeared in the scene to swill all actions and reactions through its dreadful silence. This dreadful silence is the real exposure where a mournful mother revealed the birth secret of her demised son. Kunti gained her confidence of revealing Karna’s birth secret to the Pandavas but in too late; because Karna was no more existed in life, nor he is able to return in his mother’s womb!

The incident was shocking for Pandavas. Yudhishthira lost his desire to play the king’s rule and now it appeared disastrous to Arjuna. The great Ambidexter is lying on the ground before seeing the heaven’s gate. His valiance or tactic has no more useful of rescuing him to the death. The daring Bhima has no more in life due to his gluttonous habit and senseless affairs. His killing of Duryodhana was not legal, where he breached the war principle. Bhima’s rage blinded his mind on the moment when he killed his longtime enemy. The most notorious enemy also deserves an equal chance in a war but Bhima ignored it due to his turbulent desire of murdering his childhood enemy. He was oblivious to the truth that you cannot forget the essence of Dharma even in the serious moment of killing your lifetime rival; you have to be compassionate and considerable before killing the nastiest enemy even.

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Set of Peter Brook’s Drama Mahabharata

… This body is incapable of realizing the reality that, none is virtuous or nobody is heinous in the real existential state, in where nothing exists which can be achievable through desire. When a man realized the truth, he then stimulated his mind to cross the mind-barrier so he can finish his work without any hope of success or anxiety of failure. This is the eternal state where a man switched off his mind of achieving something through his action.
… … …

Bhima’s attitude was ugly in that case. The death master is now rewarding Pabandev’s (Air deity) valiant son for his imprudent actions. Nakula and Sahadeva already have no more in the earth. The twin brothers were hypnotized to their own beauty and it led them to the narcissistic haughtiness, which is reverse to the beauty of Self-Love and Self-Knowing. Loving and knowing one’s own Self is essential to feel the world’s action in his beautifully architected body, but there is a subtle cleft always existed amid the Self Lovingness and Narcissism and it has needed to address by the Self-Lover. He is a true Self-Lover who can see the world in his body-container; who can feel and realize the massive architecture in his tiny frame; can touch or smell its beauty or ugliness by thinking that he is also the part of this grand narrative. It gives him the cheerful pleasure of loving other’s Self by staying his own Self-Loving state.

Self-consciousness is necessary if you want to assimilate the cosmic fate in your living existence with a peaceful mind. Self is the mirror of consciousness. When the Self itself feels the autonomous appearance and disappearance of the world in its body-container, it leaves the searching of knowing the existence and staying in the simplicity of just loving or enjoying the beauty of it. Narcissism is reverse in that context. The Self is being terrified there to see the autonomous playing of creation and tried to hide the anxiety by forgetting the whole world. A narcissist’s Self-Loving is the despair that nothing can rescue him to the fear of the unknown, so loving other is meaningless; what he can do is drowning his mind to the hypnotic love of his own Self in this anarchic creation. Nakula and Sahadeva’s Self-Loving was not narcissistic at all but the twin had always motivated them to their hypnotic pride of Sbakama (one’s narcissistic feeling and action of sexual union with one’s own Self).

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Disco.teak: Peter Brook in Mahabharata, the Avignon Festival in 1984.

… Mahabharata’s fictional prelude started with the daring egotism, the characters were eager to fulfill their earthly desire of life, but the ending of this battle was pathetically dreadful, in where the mournful regret declared the necessity of peace over and again. Yes, stay in peace to the feeling that you have nothing to achieve in the battle of egotism but you can lose everything that you have desired. Shanti Parva recalled the truth that egotism is just a mind-game of this earthly life but it disguised the fact that life is commencing here from the ultimate Nothingness.
… … …

Yudhishthira is alone now. None of his beloveds is alive to enter the heaven’s gate with him. No, none is alive for his journey to the heaven, except the pity dog. The witless dog was following him since the beginning moment of his journey and not leaves him for a minute. Yudhishthira is now standing out the heaven’s gate with the dogged animal, though heaven is restricted for animal’s entrance. The heaven’s guard allowed Yudhishthira but hindering him to leave the dog outside before entering the sacred place. The situation is critical for the Pandava King; it is not possible for him to enter the heaven without his companion. Heaven invited him but he stolid to the promise that he will not enter into heaven without his road-fellow. Yudhishthira yet trying to convince the guard, “Dear brother, I will never enter heaven without my companion. He accompanied me all the way in this tough journey. How can I leave him outside the heaven’s gate? Sorry, it’s better for me that I will go to the hell if you do not permit my companion’s entrance in the heaven.”

The dog then comes to its original form. Yudhishthira was bargaining with the heaven’s guard and he looked very tenacious on that time. Suddenly he noticed that the dog is no more in there and instead his great father Dharma is standing beside to him. A strange feeling captured his mind when his father embraced him and said, “Dear son, I am testing you, now let leave your shell and enter the resting place. You are now free for carrying the duality of life. Let enter in the eternal nothingness. You were staying as nothing in the nothingness before appeared to the life and now time is coming to erase your experiences what you have contained in this shell. Let leave this shell for entering the ultimate nothingness. My son, what you have achieved in life is over now. I invited you to stay in the shapeless and thoughtless Nirgun, the ultimate fate of Shogun creation.”

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Buddha’s journey: Pinterest Collection

… This reality is the reason of all appearance and disappearance and it always existed without having any purpose or definition of anybody. It has no God, no religion, no mind, no imagery or intention, nor does it have any desire of intention to explain what reality is or what it should be! It existed beyond over the concept and perception of existence. The original reality is not fictional; it simply existed having any necessity of existence. Yudhishthira has now slowly omitted himself to the eternal non-fictional Nirguna.
… … …

Yudhishthira’s mind was going far beyond the mind after receiving his father’s articulated wording. He was living in a fictional reality for such a long days and was active in the reality by defining it in his own mind. He was there so far his mind allowed him of seeing, feeling, touching and thinking about the reality. The game is over and he is ready to omit his existence to an always-existed reality. This reality is the reason of all appearance and disappearance and it always existed without having any purpose or definition of anybody. It has no God, no religion, no mind, no imagery or intention, nor does it have any desire of intention to explain what reality is or what it should be! It existed beyond over the concept and perception of existence. The original reality is not fictional; it simply existed having any necessity of existence. Yudhishthira has now slowly omitted himself to the eternal non-fictional Nirguna.

The moral is simple; —nothing exists when the days are over. Animal, human, deity or the monster gets equal fate in the meaningless non-fictional reality. They dissolved in the Nirgun Samadhi and staying eternally in the meaningless reality, which is purposelessly autonomous to its state of action. Yudhishthira is just now entered the reality that has no beginning and neither an ending.

… Let leave this shell for entering the ultimate nothingness…

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Buddha’s journey: Pinterest Collection

(Continued to the next part)

First part link: Monster tales and the fictional reality (First Part) Kirno Sohochari
Second part link: Monster tales and the fictional reality (Second Part) Kirno Sohochari
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