Monster tales and the fictional reality (Fourth Part) ⇒ Kirno Sohochari

Yudhishthira’s mythical epoch (See previous part: Monster tales and the fictional reality (Third Part) has vanished long days ago. Machine age though dictates today’s world but the chemistry of religion and human often happened in today. Men and animal yet enfolded them in the necessity chain. Kurukshetra still is the dramatic event of human life but Vanaprastha has no more existed in anywhere. Shanti Parva sounds absurd in the civilized territory. No heaven belong in anywhere which can make the heaven’s journey a truthful event for life. Doubt and infidelity distorted the heavenly imagery far long ago. None has seen over nowadays who can find out the eternal resting place for a man. No, nobody is there but everybody has seen that everyone is going to the hell even faster than the past.

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Adea edizioni: Peter Brook’s Mahabharata: Truth and Lies

 

Today’s reality stands far away to the heaven. The knowledge seeker keeps him busy to debunk Unknowable by using the Knowable, and people keep them busy to chew the lollipop that they called knowledge of the world’s reality. The middle point still existed even in today behind the sight, but Dharma has not seen clearly from anywhere in the world. Maybe it has existed as well but has not seen with clarity, but religion exists with all of its infamous duality as it was before.
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Heaven’s Journey sound absurd but a journey to the hell yet even realistic. Today’s human lives in a different reality. The functionality is utmost singular in that reality. This singularity is different to the remotest past when fiction was born to depict human’s varicolored relation with the entire creation. Yudhishthira’s era was associative in nature. The interaction and intersection of Natural and Supernatural Beings were a common event in that epical reality. Human and deity had maintained distinctive distance to each other but their action was symmetrical on that epochal time. It was the age of clash and attachment between Nature-living human and Super-Natural deities or the monsters. The men, animal or monster consequently rewarded the same fate according to the action they have done on those days.

It was the time when fiction might appear real to the One and reality looked bit fictional to him. Mahabharata’s narrative was integrated with the epic reality and that is the permanent abode for all Nature-living or Super-Natural Beings. Mahabharata tried to touch the real ground where the appearance and disappearance of creation-stuffs are nothing but the bubbling in an empty-looking nothingness

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Temple purohit: Karna’s death in Mahabharata

 

… Mahabharata’s narrative takes us to the state where everything is drowning amid the middle point of Knowing and Not Knowing. This point is Nirjnana (the senseless state of Knowable Knowing and the Unknowable), which means everything has vanished and not vanished at all, something has to be existed in the middle point to be Unknowable for us, and that is Dharma.
… … …

Yudhishthira’s heaven was epic in that sense. This is the heaven where no one is better or worse rather than the others. Every action has its own reaction and everyone should punish by the same equality, and we see it in Mahabharata’s dramatic landscape. We see it when the Pandava King started his journey to the empty-looking heaven along with his beloved family members. This empty heaven belongs far away to the egoistic battle of expository creation-stuffs. Yudhishthira’s heaven is his Dharma, who observe the desire-oriented Beings and as well follows the action of his legitimate son, but himself is the resident of undesirous heaven. Nothing is precious or heinous in that purposeless residence. Existential is going down to the reality that belongs undefined in that unimaginable space. Nobody is needed there to justify anybody’s action. Only one condition is required to enter this heaven, and that is, —you have to leave this shell before the entrance. Yudhishthira has obeyed the condition by apart himself to the earthly desire and the happiest or painful memories of human life.

An empty mind occupied the Pandava King before his heaven entrance. No memory was present in his mind that can give him the slightest pain or jovial feeling of happiness. He just disposed him in the forgotten state and nothing has existed in that state which he can memorize. Yes, he lost his mind completely to the oblivion that, once upon a time he was born to defeat the Kuru lineage and conquer the earth as a deceived king of Indraprastha. Absolute reality always belonging by exceeding the memory limit of any creation or the reality of creation within it. The existence or dissolution of creation meant nothing in that absolute state. This state is the ultimate reality and creation itself the integral part of it. That’s why hope for heavenly reward or fear for hellish punishment is simply fictional. Hope for anything or terrified by fearfulness perhaps the absurd mind-game of the Human Being, who separated himself to the absolute reality by using his Self-conscious intellect to the events.

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Canviar: God Om third eye

 

… The absolute reality is nothing in that sense, albeit it contains all possible everything within the nothingness… For that reason the Shoguna never died in the Nirguna state, the relic of it could be straying as nothing and invisible or it could be continuing the bubbling over-and-again in different shapes. That’s why reality is the never ended container of possible happenstance, which mind cannot able to guess through knowledge-oriented cognition.
… … …

Absolute reality has made of Nirguna (the eternal nothingness state of creation-stuffs) principle, whereas the transient reality is not like that, it has embodied by Shoguna form (the shell that contains all sensory organs and memories of the creation-stuffs for a transient period). Yudhishthira had experienced this when he entered in the Nirguna state by vanished his Shoguna form. His inner Self then guided him consciously to leave the memories what he had experienced through his body-machine. Self-consciousness was driving him to the question that, what be the objective of seeking knowledge or chase behind the answer of any question which is incapable of solving the Reality Mystery? Somebody was talking with him in his deep within, to say, “O the Sakara, diva niva doo”; that means, —O the bodily existence, switched off the light and let enter the absolute reality with an empty mind.

It was perhaps the last conversation of the Pandava King with his own Self and the conversation helped him to realize, —a man has nothing to achieve or lost when he withdraws himself to the reality-check problem. The reality is not a problem but the man he himself is a problem who thinks he will get the problem-solving answer by using his cognitive knowledge capacity. How can he solve the Reality-problem while the Reality is staying in Nirguna state, and while creation is waving ins-and-out there like the autonomous bubbling of watery atoms in the sea? The mind sees the transient appearance and disappearance of creation-stuffs but incapable of seeing the state where the game is happening. One’s mind can explain the game through reasoning but none is able to see the limitless ocean where the actual act is happening, and nor anybody can explain the unseen container which is actually the integral part of creation-game.

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Oknation: Light of the Buddha

 

… Things are born and died and transformed into the transcendental reality which itself is absolute. Yudhishthira is not dead but which dead is his body, he was not born but which born was his body, the essence of his presence always remains in the absolute reality. The body is only the container of organic things and temporal experiences, but the core essence of the body always existed in the unchanged absolute, maybe in a different shape or maybe it existed there as Naught.
… … …

Knowledge is perfect to understand the tangible Yudhishthira and his life-event reality, but the same knowledge is imperfect for explaining the intangible Pandava King who doesn’t belong in the tangible form after his death. Where could he go then? The answer is simple if we stop our thinking about his departure, and if we can stop our mind to treat the departure case of living creatures as a Reality-problem. Our mind then supplied us the simple solution that, Yudhishthira (or anybody alike to him) might go elsewhere or nowhere but certainly he is existed in somewhere; perhaps he is existed in the “not anything” state as like the “not anything”. This “not anything” is the absolute absence where the arrival and departure are always bubbling sans any reason. The visible reality is the bubbling of creation-stuffs and it comes to the absolute absence and dissolves in the same absence without having any dictation of anybody. An absence is such kind of reality which nobody can dictate, because, none is there to dictate it.

An absolute reality means the absolute absence of knowledge cognition. Absolute is the subjectivity of all objective appearance and disappearance. An ultimate emptiness denotes the purposeless reality and it stayed unchanged without having any attachment to the action or reaction of the appeared objects. All appearance is the part of an unchanged reality, and they vanished in the same reality when time ticks the final tick. Seeking of yonder reality through knowledge is meaningless, because, it belongs beyond over the knowledge-oriented perception of an objective mind. The absolute reality belongs far beyond the conceptual purpose of belonging. This is the ultimate silence towards all mind-made imagination, explanation, definition or conceptualization of the reality.

Absolute is the answer of absolute silence that has existed within or outside of it. When anybody entered in such state, he actually entered in his beginning state; once he appeared from there and now has vanished to the same state. Yudhishthira realized this when his father Dharma called him to leave this shell and enter the belonging state which has no beginning or ending and which is unborn and deathless. All living and non-living objects in the creation is a reflection of the always-existed reality. Things are born and died and transformed into the transcendental reality which itself is absolute. Yudhishthira is not dead but which dead is his body, he was not born but which born was his body, the essence of his presence always remains in the absolute reality. The body is only the container of organic things and temporal experiences, but the core essence of the body always existed in the unchanged absolute, maybe in a different shape or maybe it existed there as Naught. The absolute reality is nothing in that sense, albeit it contains all possible everything within the nothingness.

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Ramkinkar Baij dynamic sculpture

 

… The reality is not a problem but the man he himself is a problem who thinks he will get the problem-solving answer by using his cognitive knowledge capacity. How can he solve the Reality-problem while the Reality is staying in Nirguna state, and while creation is waving ins-and-out there like the autonomous bubbling of watery atoms in the sea?
… … …

No definition is necessary to explain such reality state. It always existed without having any definition of it. It’s not possible for us to get the answer of the question that, what is absolute reality and where is the end of it. Dharma invited Yudhishthira to enter such kind of never ended absolute reality. His heaven-looking reality has no beginning or ending, nor it does have any birth or death. This heaven existed in the immensely unlimited, unrestrained and indefinite space. The reality where Yudhishthira has belonged before his heaven entrance was the dimension of an absolute reality, and yonder reality itself has no precise dimension which one’s mind can realize. Let again to say, all dimensions are temporal bubbling in the limitless ocean of unborn reality.

Yudhishthira’s human life was Shoguna and his heaven entrance incident is Nirguna. He was obliged to complete his lifetime action before death comes to erased him. Death is the way for him to enter the Nirguna state, but nothing is an ultimatum in that state, nor anything is eternally dead in Nirguna state, transformation can again bring the dead back. For that reason the Shoguna never died in the Nirguna state, the relic of it could be straying as nothing and invisible or it could be continuing the bubbling over-and-again in different shapes. That’s why reality is the never ended container of possible happenstance, which mind cannot able to guess through knowledge-oriented cognition.

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Pinterest: Exploring Buddha Art

 

… Self-consciousness was driving him to the question that, what be the objective of seeking knowledge or chase behind the answer of any question which is incapable of solving the Reality-Mystery? Somebody was talking with him in his deep within, to say, “O the Sakara, diva niva doo”; that means, —O the bodily existence, switched off the light and let enter the absolute reality with an empty mind.
… … …

Shoguna is not an illusory experience; it contains identity and memories of the Self who is born with all interactive organs, even though Shoguna is illusory due to the changeable state of it. It died in every moment of changes and finally what left behind is the relic of it. Yudhishthira lost all of his identities when his Shoguna form was dropping bit by bit to the unknown Nirguna, but nobody correctly knows what be the next when the embodied “Self” entered in the unconscious amorphous. Mahabharata’s narrative takes us to the state where everything is drowning amid the middle point of Knowing and Not Knowing. This point is Nirjnana (the senseless state of Knowable Knowing and the Unknowable), which means everything has vanished and not vanished at all, something has to be existed in the middle point to be Unknowable for us, and that is Dharma.

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Caravan magazine: The Mahabharata Of Our Times, Peter Brook’s epic

 

Once upon a time Yudhishthira arrived in the middle point and met the eternal container of all Knowable and Unknowable reality. It was looking heaven to him. Today’s reality stands far away to the heaven. The knowledge seeker keeps him busy to debunk Unknowable by using the Knowable, and people keep them busy to chew the lollipop that they called knowledge of the world’s reality. The middle point still existed even in today behind the sight, but Dharma has not seen clearly from anywhere in the world. Maybe it has existed as well but has not seen with clarity, but religion exists with all of its infamous duality as it was before. Perhaps today’s people need to start again the heaven’s journey to meet the unending container of reality to feel that, nothing is lost or missing in that always existed container and this nameless container is eternal to its purposeless belonging.

(Continued to the next part)

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Oknation: Light of the Buddha

 

First part link: Monster tales and the fictional reality (First Part) Kirno Sohochari
Second part link: Monster tales and the fictional reality (Second Part) Kirno Sohochari 
Third part link: Monster tales and the fictional reality (Third Part) Kirno Sohochari 
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