When the image is born (Part-3) ⇒ Kirno Sohochari

Painting is the reverse vibration of that reality which it imitates. When a painter oscillates the visible world in his canvas as if he is a copyist, but he trimmed many things when he copied. He deviates himself to imitate any types of self-ordained decorum; rather he disorganized order of things by using the trickery which might come to his mind when he paints. An inner urgency may incite him to rearrange the order of things with different postures. Seer’s sensual recognition and his feelings to the ordained decorum of things in the real world then collapsed due to the diversified representation of things in painter’s canvas. When a seer visits art galleries or strolls in the silent passages of a museum he soon realized the enframed painting objects, despite their natural trend of imitates real things, they are not the same objects he has used to see in his familiar space. It doesn’t mean the representation of things in a painting canvas is unreal, or they stayed far beyond to the real world where things exist with imperial functionality; however, a painter always tried to disseminate the message that he memes real things but never copied them as a photocopier or scanning machine did often. 

Suret_1, Horse

Source: georgesseurat.org, Horse and Cart by Georges Seurat

… seer’s eyes can recognize the image of things; sensory organs are capable to feel the presence of images as real; and, his cognitive dissonance is able to infer, think or make a debate about the “invisible unchanged substance”. Even though his seeing and feeling are not able to recognize the image that could be treated “unchanged or original”; as well as the cognitive sensors yet even feeble to claim that he is the simulacrum of a static but permanently dynamic image, as for instance the primeval God of religious scriptures and mythical stories.
… … …

A scanner takes the image what we’ve supplied to it and tries best to keep the material form of the supplied image intact. It calibrates itself to capture every pixel of the scanned content so the image can look-alike the original. The scanning machine obeys the law that it will not leave a single dot during the scanning moment so that the image can appear as a perfect replica of the original. Missing dot of an image means the scanner missed a dot of information and a dot of reality as well. Photocopier or scanner type machine can replicate what we’ve usually meant by replication. Copy the real object “as it is” means the scanner type machine can represent the copied object as a replication of the real. A photocopier or the scanner machine is preconscious in that sense. They know what they have to do. They are preprogrammed to transcribe every single dot of the image they copied during the scanning moment. This capacity made the devices a true copyist of the real image that might exist in a transitory world

However, on the other hand, the finest machine will do mistake when we command it to reproduce the original image “as it is” for numerous number and time. If anybody uses the general image scanner and command it to reproduce images “as it is” then it will miss dots after a certain moment of time. The copyist can collapse due to the technical fault or maybe it can expire by reaching its maximum limit of replication. It then delivers garbled images to us. That means the purpose of emulation through the image scanner is finite; even the most powerful scanner, suppose a drum scanner or something more powerful than this, they will as well collapse because of their ultimate limit as a copyist. It indicates even the preprogrammed machine has its own limitation of imitates every single dot of the real object frequently. The image it delivers will appear abstruse to the person who appointed it to supply some real image of things “as it is”. 

The problem of repeating original objects through duplication helps us to understand the moral that we can imitate objects as much as near to the original but not “as it is”. Nothing could remain “as it is” in the planet where we are strolling now; even the architect atoms of the whole universe cannot be precisely “as it is” when they construct real images to make the universe extant. Plato’s Ideal World where unchanged objects stayed as fundamental images of reality, and from where the transient images of this visible world appear over again like the simulation of unchanged, it is not possible in that context. Contrary, the presence of such objects in an ideal world might possible if we consider the philosophical hypothesis that something needed to remain as “substance” which can replicate the images of life oft again. Yes, something has needed to be remaining original so it can play the master artist’s rule and able to deliver images from the horrific void looking nothing. We can consider this “something” the only existence that can draw the reality-picture, not likely “as it is” but as far as “as it is”. 

Madwhacharya_1

Source: Wikipedia, Madhvacharya

… Shankaracharya, the pioneer of Non-dualism treated the images of this real world as Maya (illusion) and Madhva made his disagreement with Shankar in this point; to him, we can treat the images of the visible world an addition of untainted God instead of thinking it Maya. He thinks God Vishnu is the reason for every “thing”, and contrary he is isolated from that every “thing” due to his unchanged unbound untainted originality. Today’s science tried to touch the same ground that there has to be something remain in the abyssal of atoms which are the hidden player of every “thing”, but the originality of this unknown something could never change. 
… … …

The duality is here; we are able imaging what we see and contrary incapable to draw the image which might act as staid and deftly kept its invisible image by going beyond our recognition. The problem of imaging unseen images could comparable with the God problem, which yet enrolled our mind by the dubious imagery or inference. Madhvacharya, the influential thinker of God in Indian Philosophy compare the image of God with mathematical digit Zero. This number doesn’t contain a value within itself but the addition or multiplication of Zero with other numbers (suppose 1 to 9) can lead us to infinite. Means, Zero is not empty or void what we’ve used to think when we imagine it; instead, it is the number that can construct multiple mathematical patterns and geometry to make the real things visible for our sensory organs.

The image of God contained such Zero-like value that can stay in reality with its fullness. Madhvacharya mentioned it as Poorna Brahma, which means an indivisible God who exists “unchanged” with His qualities; and plays His rule of constructing images oft again. Is he knowable for us? Madhvacharya said “yes”, He is knowable so far we know about how reality acts. Is He unknowable? The thinker replied, “Yes”, He is unknowable due to his self-driven “Overallity”. If He is knowable then He doesn’t remain as God at all; contrary, if he is completely unknowable then we cannot get any images about God or the creation process of the universe. 

Shankaracharya, the pioneer of Non-dualism treated the images of this real world as Maya (illusion) and Madhva made his disagreement with Shankar in this point; to him, we can treat the images of the visible world an addition of untainted God instead of thinking it Maya. The addition reflects His “Will”; He can create images if He willed to do this by keeping His “originality” unchanged. Madhvacharya interprets the essence of Vaishnavism in this way. He thinks God Vishnu is the reason for every “thing”, and contrary he is isolated from that every “thing” due to his unchanged unbound untainted originality. Today’s science tried to touch the same ground that there has to be something remain in the abyssal of atoms which are the hidden player of every “thing”, but the originality of this unknown something could never change. 

… … … 

Cave Paintings_3

Source: theonion.com; newly discovered cave painting of Paleolithic era, Northern Spain

… The simple picture shows how life was terrifying in the prehistoric eras. It relates us to realize we’ve also fated to carry the same ambiance yet even. This message reminds how the most realistic situation of life can throw us in the nightmare-like absurdity. When we feel the unseen terror underneath our skin then we realized we are living a strenuous life in this planet with ambiguous nightmares.
… … …

The battle amid seen and unseen images continued since to the prehistoric age. Cave dwellers pictured their hardship battle of food hunting in the cave wall. They also manifested their immense fear, homage, and curiosity to the hunted animal, just because to save them from the wrath of dead animal’s soul, which they think could appear detrimental for life. The imagery feelings of the detrimental unknown then led them to illustrate pictures of racing, chasing and battling against the hefty animals; furthermore, they also depicted their anxiety, helplessness, worry and even the fear of inner demons in the cave wall. For instance, a recent archeological discovery of Paleolithic cave painting in Northern Spain shows how the adverse vibes captured cave dwellers’ mind by bad dreams, unknown terrors and hallucinatory sounds or images. 

Life is difficult today but it was not easy to handle even in the prehistoric eras. The cave painter really made an excuse of difficulty when he paints the nighttime scene with charcoal. Lead researcher Allan Reddy marked the picture “crude in terms”; he thinks this picture indicates “… Ice Age humans had an awful lot of personal stuff going on”; though they were used to live a clan-oriented life. The sharing of common was essential for this life and which is now absent in modern civilization. Modern era completely uprooted the basic of common sharing when it got progress towards urban life. The chemical analysis of the painting said something about the infallible struggle of the cave members who suddenly wake up in the middle of the night as if nightmare forced them to wake so the painting can tell something about the peculiarity of life. 

The image shows up a man sitting on the antelope skin; it also indicates another man who is trying hard to start the fire; and as well a woman rubs her thighs with a sharp stone piece in such way as if she tries to kindle the fire by rubbing the stone in her skin, but it appeared injurious and going to chop her body now. The seated man looks dejected to think about the frightful agony of life; it awakes him in midnight and now he takes a seat on the antelope skin to see the comedy of life; e.g., they are at moment caught by the nightmare that they cannot kindle the fire for safety and warmth. The simple picture shows how life was terrifying in the prehistoric eras. It relates us to realize we’ve also fated to carry the same ambiance yet even. This message reminds how the most realistic situation of life can throw us in the nightmare-like absurdity. When we feel the unseen terror underneath our skin then we realized we are living a strenuous life in this planet with ambiguous nightmares. 

Vermeer_1_3, Girl With A Pearl Earring,Final, 1665

Source: vermeer-foundation.org; Girl With A Pearl Earring, 1665 by Johannes Vermeer

… Vermeer’s ornamented photographic painting always reflects the startling moments, as if something is going behind the painting characters which a seer can guess but can never be sure what was actually happened on this moment… his painting indicates real things and their relation with human get fractured or broken when a painter pick them for his canvas. This is called implicit silence that may deserve seer’s involvement and his conscious connotation so he can associate him to read the meaning of the real things in art, and as well as the difference it makes with the images of extant reality. 
… … …

The example of cave painting clearly debunks the truth that the real images of life are not static. They are not steady and reliable as we think often. Neurobiologist Semir Zeki mentioned two types of constancy in his book “Inner Vision: An Exploration of Art and the Brain” to get the answer that how images are born in painter’s visual cortex and how he deals with them. He analyzed Dutch golden age painter Vermeer and renaissance artist Michelangelo’s works in one chapter of his book. Zeki treated Vermeer’s home life oriented painting a reflexion of Situational Constancy; where the painter visualizes his mind to paint the detail of an object and applied color and light to catch the photogenic reality; on the other hand, this artistic approach protect his painting subject to represent memes. Vermeer paints his objects in such ways if a seer stands in front of his canvas the smell of voyeurism soon captured his mind; he then thinks this painter is a voyeur, who love to see the home-making affairs by hiding his existence, as a peeper always do when he peeps to see other people’s private affairs. 

Vermeer’s ornamented photographic painting always reflects the startling moments, as if something is going behind the painting characters which a seer can guess but can never be sure what was actually happened on this moment. The situation which he depicted in his canvas suppose “The Milkmaid, Lady Writing a Letter with her Maid, The Music Lesson, and his most notorious painting Girl with a Pearl Earring”…, all are related to the situation which seers can guess but cannot make sure what they (painting characters) were doing when Vermeer paints them. He soaked them in the mystery so seers can guess but never could be sure of it. 

This uncertainty relates Vermeer’s painting with Implicit Constancy. Semir Zeki actually applied it to mean the unfinished artworks of a painter, suppose St. Pieta and many other incomplete works of Renaissance artist Michelangelo. An implicit painting deserves retouch and it could be finished in myriad ways but it depends on the number of images that might store in painter’s visual cortex. Vermeer’s artwork is complete in this sense. However, the mystery he creates by using expensive color and lighting effect, such technique mobilized his painting to carry the Implicit Constancy as well. For instance, his notorious “Girl with a Pearl Earring” hides something forbidden and that makes it implicitly viable and worthy for an art lover. Girl’s facial expression beckons her anxiety, deceitfulness, fear of somebody, and the alluring affection to somebody as well. Who is the man she caught by? The answer is difficult to guess now; he might be the artist himself who had a forbidden affair with this girl, and he cleverly maintained the relationship by hiding it to his wife and family. 

Vermeer’s painting indicates real things and their relation with human get fractured or broken when a painter pick them for his canvas. This is called implicit silence that may deserve seer’s involvement and his conscious connotation so he can associate him to read the meaning of the real things in art, and as well as the difference it makes with the images of extant reality. Art denies reality and the artist always try to paint what his visual cortex told him to paint. An artist denies the order of things that might make by the humans, and the system now tried to dominate him by this. Artist’s rebellion against the order of things can only save his soul to the ordained discipline of life, where he tried to reverse the order of things through his artistry, as Cubist and Surrealist did and to the consequence Abstract and even the Realistic artform tried to do it often. 

Gaganendranath Tagore_1_2, Meeting at the Staircase

Source: indiapicks.com; Meeting at the staircase by Gaganendranath Tagore

… Which was untrodden on that time has passed over many years before, but the essence of creating silence so seer can shudder by it, that ambiguous feeling of the different version of reality yet continued in this world. Painting is the ambiguous narrative of beauty. It can create a new sensation by going against the modest definition of beauty, where real things act as if they are talking bird.
… … …

The key motif of alluring artwork might be this that it will talk less and tried to muting itself, so the seers can feel urge talking on behalf of it. We can take Gaganendranath Tagore‘s artwork “Meeting at the Staircase” for instance. Captioned watercolor painting is a simple example of how a painter composites his implicit visionary through the beautiful application of light and shadows under the dark abyssal of life. Two Indian homemakers are standing at the staircase, maybe they are talking about something, and we do not know what it could be. Seer sees the light source that might come to the upper floor and spotted the stairs and trying to cover the dark surface of the house. Which time it was? Might be it was the typical nighttime or evening or late night when the two mysterious-looking women met each other at the staircase. What they were talking. Tough to guess, because no clues are there that can help us to infer something about the talking contents. The topic most probably was ordinary; maybe they were conversing on family affairs; not strange, if they talked something conspiratorial. A seer can guess anything in here and everything is valid because of the muted silence of the ambiance. Not a single clue remained there that could help him to reach a solid conclusion. 

Gaganendranath, as a powerful artist and cartoonist, his name may hear little unfamiliar to today’s Indian seers of art, if we consider his brother Abanindranath Tagore and the noted Uncle Rabindranath Tagore‘s contribution in Indian artistry and literature. Indian art historian Partha Mitter thinks that man was the first Indian who was very experimental on the Cubist form. He invented his own style for using the geometric deformity of Cubism to break the ordained perception of reality, and he uses it by keeping Indian traditional context intact. The time was rebellious. Bengal Art School Movement (he was also the pioneer member and movementists of that school) tried to deny the western art technique by using ancient and medieval art form of India and oriental; especially the Mughal miniature painting and Japanese art form influenced Bengal artists on that time. 

Gaganendranth’s work was very versatile in that context. He passionately applied Japanese art form in his canvas, was frequent to deform the figure by using cubist geometry, so that the painting can relate itself with Indian Mystic essence. His fascination to apply light-and-shadow in the dark abyssal is alluring. Later it influenced his famed uncle who depicted the inner world of the human soul by using the vivid dark background in his canvas. Rabindranath later commented on his nephew’s artstyle where he marked his path as “untrodden” in Indian context:

“What profoundly attracted me was the uniqueness of his creation, a lively curiosity in his constant experiments, and some mysterious depth in their imaginative value. Closely surrounded by the atmosphere of a new art movement…he sought out his own untrodden path of adventure, attempted marvellous experiments in colouring and made fantastic trials in the magic of light and shade.” [1938]

Gaganendranath Tagore_9_1, Caption Untitled

Source: indiapicks.com; Composition by Gaganendranath Tagore

… The problem of repeating original objects through duplication helps us to understand the moral that we can imitate objects as much as near to the original but not “as it is”. Nothing could remain “as it is” in the planet where we are strolling now; even the architect atoms of the whole universe cannot be precisely “as it is” when they construct real images to make the universe extant.
… … …

Which was untrodden on that time has passed over many years before, but the essence of creating silence so seer can shudder by it, that ambiguous feeling of the different version of reality yet continued in this world. Painting is the ambiguous narrative of beauty. It can create a new sensation by going against the modest definition of beauty, where real things act as if they are talking bird. The duty of a painter is there, he must prepare himself to throw his inner voice in the canvas, as Giorgio de Chirico once mentioned by standing on the surreal peak:

“To become truly immortal a work of art must escape all human limits: logic and common sense will only interfere. But once these barriers are broken it will enter the regions of childhood vision and dream… It is most important that we should rid art of all that it has contained ‘recognizable material’ to date, all familiar subject matter, all traditional ideas, all popular symbols must be banished forthwith. More important still, we must hold enormous faith in ourselves; it is essential that the revelation we receive, the conception of an image which embraces a certain thing, which has no sense in itself, which has no subject, which means ‘absolutely nothing’ from the logical point of view…should speak so strongly in us, evoke such agony or joy, that we feel compelled to paint.” [See: Letters of the great artists –from Ghiberti to Gainsborough, Richard Friedenthal, Thames and Hudson, London, 1963]

… … …

Jackson Pollock_1, Out of the web 1949

Source: jackson-pollock.org; Out of the Web, 1949 by Jackson Pollock

… This is something like the new kind of beauty where the order of things shuddered by the new wave of deformity and annihilation; which mean the usual sense of reality is spoiled by the wave of abstraction which Pollock flooded in his large canvas. This kind of abstraction always reflexes the absence of something. Questions are inevitable here; that is, “what”? —What is absence there that might need to reconstruct?
… … …

Let come to the point, how a seer can read the reality a painting object reflexes? How he can differentiate his usual reality sense when he stands in front of the painting canvas with a dizzy mind? Let make the question bit difficult, how he faces the abstraction of life and real objects that are now very frequent in painting canvas? The answer of all these questions is not a ready-made set. We cannot say what he feels that should be treated his judgment to the artwork and rest is immaterial. Is it? We know a seer’s eyes can recognize the image of things; sensory organs are capable to feel the presence of images as real; and, his cognitive dissonance is able to infer, think or make a debate about the “invisible unchanged substance”. Even though his seeing and feeling are not able to recognize the image that could be treated “unchanged or original”; as well as the cognitive sensors yet even feeble to claim that he is the simulacrum of a static but permanently dynamic image, as for instance the primeval God of religious scriptures and mythical stories. He can at best infer it by using his imaginative inference and logic sense; as philosophy and religion infer the “unchanged image” as God; as science infer it the elementary kinetic force of all later repercussions; as poets and painters treat the image an ultimate necessity for abstruse abstraction, so they can get their freedom to break the order of things which confined them to whirl around the fence of fixed images. 

Lucretius once might be victimized by the same puzzlement when he meditates “atom” as the implicit reality builder. The poet then writes:

“Which come and go whilst Nature stands the same,
We’re wont, and rightly, to call accidents.
Even time exists not of itself; but sense
Reads out of things what happened long ago,
What presses now, and what shall follow after:
No man, we must admit, feels time itself,
Disjoined from motion and repose of things.

And thus thou canst remark that every act
At bottom exists not of itself, nor is
As body is, nor has like name with void;
But rather of sort more fitly to be called
An accident of body, and of place
Wherein all things go on.” [Lucretius, Poem: Book I Part 04, Nothing Exists Per Se Except Atoms And The Void, Source: poemhunter.com;]

The meditative recognition of Lucretius somehow makes a relation, for instance, Jackson Pollocks abstraction that he dripped in his painting, especially his 50’s artwork “Out of the Web”. Lucretius’ banishment of things in the void can compare with the dancing web of Pollock’s deformed entities. Things’ banishment in the void may do not mean they vanished into the empty space for forever; what is vanish there that might be compatible with Pollock’s “Dancing web”, where the fragmented dancing structures try to escape the webnet of real things. Things are made of atoms but the motion of atoms might exist in the void after the destruction or vanquishment. How motion exists? —it could be difficult to guess but certain motion exists within atoms to play the game of construction, destruction, and de-construction over again; so images can revive after the declination into the ghostly surface overtly again. The spiral clouds with the stained black in Pollock’s canvas may appear as a reminder of this moral. 

Jackson Pollock_4, Full fathom five, 1947

Source: jackson-pollock.org; Full Fathom Five, 1947 by Jackson Pollock

 … Things are made of atoms but the motion of atoms might exist in the void after the destruction or vanquishment. How motion exists? —it could be difficult to guess but certain motion exists within atoms to play the game of construction, destruction, and de-construction over again; so images can revive after the declination into the ghostly surface overtly again. The spiral clouds with the stained black in Pollock’s canvas may appear as a reminder of this moral.
… … …

Pollock’s artistic style was reluctant to use an easel or usual painting tools; his dripping technique where he dripped color in the painting frame like the oozing raindrops to make his inner feelings visible; this technique, on the other hand, helps him to break the essence that we somehow caught by the web of fixity and cannot escape. “Out of the Web” with its own Lucretius-flavor captured seer’s mind to feel it. The painter help us to understand, life certainly the accidental whisper of ghostly atoms but the motion by which it made is eternal in the void-looking nothing; yes, they are dancing on the webnet like the mesmeric jinglers; and Pollock decorates his canvas by following his own style and abstraction to deform the presence of real things through obscurity. 

Jackson Pollock’s artworks incite us to rethink about the beauty of art once again. This is something like the new kind of beauty where the order of things shuddered by the new wave of deformity and annihilation; which mean the usual sense of reality is spoiled by the wave of abstraction which Pollock flooded in his large canvas. This kind of abstraction always reflexes the absence of something. Questions are inevitable here; that is, “what”? —What is absence there that might need to reconstruct? Is it images? Is it our sensual recognition of real things? Alternatively, is it indicates the absence of words? Or is it true, suchlike painting needed textual interpretation to reconstruct the image of reality again? Neither, it completely needed the bridging amid art objects it uses in the canvas, so we can back to the order of things again? 

We’ll find these answers in the next chapter with Rene Magritte’s claim that he painted a tobacco pipe, but unfortunately, “this is not a pipe”. 

… … …

Cave Paintings_4

Source: Wikipedia; Cave Painting: Archivo: Cueva de las Manos
… The key motif of alluring artwork might be this that it will talk less and tried to muting itself, so the seers can feel urge talking on behalf of it…
Previous Chapter Link:
1. When the image is born (Part-2) ⇒ Kirno Sohochari;
2. When the image is born (Part-1) ⇒ Kirno Sohochari

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