Today’s Shared Post_Link: 28 March 2017

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Published Date: 03.28.2017 

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… I know always that I am an outsider; a stranger in this century and among those who are still men…


“Cosmic horror is a growing subgenre in the ranks of horror fiction. Cosmicism is “the literary philosophy developed and used by the American writer H. P. Lovecraft in his weird fiction.” The Wikipedia definition follows:

The philosophy of cosmicism states that there is no recognizable divine presence, such as a god, in the universe, and that humans are particularly insignificant in the larger scheme of intergalactic existence, and perhaps are just a small species projecting their own mental idolatries onto the vast cosmos. This also suggests that the majority of undiscerning humanity are creatures with the relative significance of insects and plants, when compared to the universe.

Perhaps the most prominent theme in cosmicism is the insignificance of humanity…

Cosmicism is rooted in the absence of God and, ultimately, any sort of morality and meaning tethered to such a Presence. Lovecraft described his worldview this way:

The universe is only a furtive arrangement of elementary particles… The human race will disappear. Other races will appear and disappear in turn. The sky will become icy and void, pierced by the feeble light of half-dead stars. Which will also disappear. Everything will disappear. And what human beings do is just as free of sense as the free motion of elementary particles. Good, evil, morality, feelings? Pure ‘Victorian fictions’. Only egotism exists.”…

… The oldest and strongest emotion of mankind is fear… Ultimate horror often paralyses memory in a merciful way…

What Does Cosmic Horror’ Mean? Matthew M. Bartlett provided a good summary of the consensus sentiment:

…cosmic horror is about not only man’s insignificance, but his fragility, both physical and mental. Except for the fact that man is haunted by the vast gulf of nonexistence before his lifespan and its fast-returning resumption, he is in a fundamental way not terribly different from a newborn who dies within minutes of his birth. There’s an awakening into incomprehensible chaos, bright and loud and terrifying, and then it’s all gone. Forever. In our moment of chaos, we witness abjection, corruption, violence, and a ubiquitous instability of all systems—a general sense that we are at all times unsafe. And while there are beautiful things here for some of us–love, comfort, entertainments, the company of friends, and of animals–we fear that those good things exist only to mock us. In the end, we face the ultimate forgetting.”…


… I have seen the dark universe yawning
Where the black planets roll without aim,
Where they roll in their horror unheeded,
Without knowledge, or lustre, or name…


“In his essay on Lovecraft entitled Atheism’s Mythographer, Jason Colavito notes: 

“The key to the abyss in Lovecraft’s world was Science itself. It was through science that the well-spring of horror arose, and this is what captivated the minds of those who read him. Lovecraft introduced a new brand of horror that dispensed with the supernatural as an opposition to the natural order.”

And this is what Lovecraftian horror has on traditional horror. The real horror of Lovecraft’s cosmicism is that it has “dispensed with the supernatural.

“Behind every work of fiction is a worldview that frames it. Likewise, one difference between the traditional horror genre and cosmic horror is the cosmoses they occupy. While the horrors of Dracula, The Exorcist, Something Wicked This Way Comes, The Stand, or The Picture of Dorian Gray, are decidedly Moral — as in an Ultimate Good vs. Evil, or the violation of Good for Evil — the terrors of cosmic horror are uniquely amoral. And therein lies a different type of terror.

One is the terror of Something, while the other is the terror of Nothing.


… Living is simply a game of existential Russian Roulette in which every chamber is loaded and your turn is next. No evil can truly befall the cosmicist because he has chucked any notion of absolute Good for amorality. Pulling the trigger is as “good” as not. Things like “love, comfort, entertainments, the company of friends, and of animals” are simply meaningless distractions while we hurtle towards “the ultimate forgetting.”…


“While cosmic horror sees humanity as simply “a furtive arrangement of elementary particles,” the biblical worldview is one that envisages humankind as only “a little lower than the angels” and “crowned with glory and honor” (Ps. 8:5). Indeed, as the bearers of God’s image, we occupy a space distinct from plankton, orangutans, archangels, and Spanish moss.

In this universe, the greatest horror is in surrendering to a philosophy of nihilism and Moral indifference.

Read complete article in: 

The Real Horror of Lovecraft’s Cosmicism by Mike Duran at Decompose Blog 

Know more about Cosmicism, click following links:

1. Cosmicism on Wikipedia;
2. Cosmicism and the existential helplessness of humanity in the universe by seriously disabled;
3. H. P Lovecraft’s philosophy of “cosmicism” Published in YouTube by Baskerville Manor;
4. Cosmicism; a Perspective Born out of New Knowledge. (Lovecraft is Awesome!) by uncategorized;

Know more about H. P. Lovecraft, click following links:

1. H. P. Lovecraft in Wikipedia2. H. P Lovecraft’s Quotes (from his book) in Wikiquotes;

Goodreads quotes: Some thoughtful insight of Lovecraft …

Quote 1.1: “The world is indeed comic, but the joke is on mankind.”

Quote 1.2: “Pleasure to me is wonder—the unexplored, the unexpected, the thing that is hidden and the changeless thing that lurks behind superficial mutability.”

Quote 1.3: “The oldest and strongest emotion of mankind is fear, and the oldest and strongest kind of fear is fear of the unknown”
[Supernatural Horror in Literature]

Quote 1.4: “Almost nobody dances sober, unless they happen to be insane.”

Quote 1.5: “The most merciful thing in the world, I think, is the inability of the human mind to correlate all its contents. We live on a placid island of ignorance in the midst of black seas of the infinity, and it was not meant that we should voyage far.”
[The Call of Cthulhu and Other Weird Stories]

Quote 1.6: “The most merciful thing in the world, I think, is the inability of the human mind to correlate all its contents… some day the piecing together of dissociated knowledge will open up such terrifying vistas of reality, and of our frightful position therein, that we shall either go mad from the revelation or flee from the light into the peace and safety of a new Dark Age.”

Quote 1.7: “To be bitter is to attribute intent and personality to the formless, infinite, unchanging and unchangeable void. We drift on a chartless, resistless sea. Let us sing when we can, and forget the rest.”

Quote 1.8: “… The dog barks and begs and tumbles to amuse you when you crack the whip. That pleases a meekness-loving peasant who relishes a stimulus to his self importance. The cat, on the other hand, charms you into playing for its benefit when it wishes to be amused; making you rush about the room with a paper on a string when it feels like exercise, but refusing all your attempts to make it play when it is not in the humour. That is personality and individuality and self-respect — the calm mastery of a being whose life is its own and not yours — and the superior person recognises and appreciates this because he too is a free soul whose position is assured, and whose only law is his own heritage and aesthetic sense.”

Quote 1.9: “I know always that I am an outsider; a stranger in this century and among those who are still men.”

Quote 1.10: “It is good to be a cynic — it is better to be a contented cat — and it is best not to exist at all.”

Quote 1.11:
“I have seen the dark universe yawning
Where the black planets roll without aim,
Where they roll in their horror unheeded,
Without knowledge, or lustre, or name.”

Quote 1.12: “Pleasure to me is wonder—the unexplored, the unexpected, the thing that is hidden and the changeless thing that lurks behind superficial mutability. To trace the remote in the immediate; the eternal in the ephemeral; the past in the present; the infinite in the finite; these are to me the springs of delight and beauty.”

Quote 1.13: “I never ask a man what his business is, for it never interests me. What I ask him about are his thoughts and dreams.”

Quote 1.14: “Contrary to what you may assume, I am not a pessimist but an indifferentist- that is, I don’t make the mistake of thinking that the… cosmos… gives a damn one way or the other about the especial wants and ultimate welfare of mosquitoes, rats, lice, dogs, men, horses, pterodactyls, trees, fungi, dodos, or other forms of biological energy.”

Quote: 1.15: “Ultimate horror often paralyses memory in a merciful way.”

Photo and Cover credit: All photos are taken from Wikiquote
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