The Hyperreal world of Khaled Hafez ⇒ Kirno Sohochari

… This is a new world where images of amity often collide with animosity. The fragrance of love and attachment totters by confusion and soon it collides with hatred. No morals are eternal here that could be treated as a reward for honesty; instead, they collide with immoral within the twinkling of eyes. Fairy-looking happiness walks like a toddler and dash with tragic misfortune. Power collides with the fear of losing power. Divinity threatened and busy to wrestle with no-divinity. The life-giver atoms could collide at any moment by the life-taking reverses. We are living in a pretentious world where everything is looking fine-tuned and over certain, but they fragmented by pieces when collides with uncertainty rings the bell. The essence of super-human is a faint shadow and soon replaced by the ghostly non-human… Khaled Hafez might realize the collided duality and tries to engrave all this contrast in his canvas, so seer can feel something quickly shifted and replaced by one another, and time is none but a character of ambiguous disorder between signs. His animated paintistry echoed the truth with pop art fancy… Continue reading The Hyperreal world of Khaled Hafez ⇒ Kirno Sohochari

Chase behind the tireless ⇒ Kirno Sohochari

It’s certainly absurd, because you are eventful to hear the chirping tone, whereas a restless ghost is dancing in my head like the infamous Beelzebub. The notorious demon even reached at the rubber garden to follow me. His footstep is breaking the silence now. The notorious ghost is near to me with his deliberate snigger:… Hey! Why you are permitting a new life,
if you not know the purpose? Continue reading Chase behind the tireless ⇒ Kirno Sohochari

Why Social Contract arguments are almost always wrong ⇒ Shengwu’s article on “Trolley Problem” blog

Few top-tier debaters, and virtually no professional political philosophers, would nowadays make or defend the social contract argument as it is used in debating today. Here’s why: Social contract arguments are transparently false and intellectually dishonest, even though they are so commonplace in debating that most debaters don’t question their basic premises. Let’s run through several interpretations of what a ‘social contract’ could mean, and see why they are all deeply problematic./ Read the point blogger Shengwu raised in his article for further argument and debate. Continue reading Why Social Contract arguments are almost always wrong ⇒ Shengwu’s article on “Trolley Problem” blog